Hart Parr 18-36

Hart Parr 18-36
Hart Parr 18-36

Hart Parr was a very early American builder of gas tractors with the Hart Parr 30-60 being one of the more successful “Prairie” style tractors. However by 1919 the Prairie style tractors were obsolete being far too big and clumsy for the average farmer of the time.  The need was for a smaller more nimble tractors. Hart Parr’s first attempt to meet the needs of farmers at the time, the “Little Devil”, was a complete failure and the tractors were recalled. However, the right direction was taken in 1918 with the “New Hart Parr” 12-25 model, which formed the basis for all subsequent Hart-Parr tractors. The “New Hart Parr” was a tractor equipped with a two-cylinder, slow speed, water-cooled engine with force feed lubrication and open gears used to drive the rear wheels. The design after testing in Nebraska was re-rated at 15-30. The 15-30 design was replaced in 1924 by the 16-30 design which was upgraded in 1926 to become the 18-36.

Hart Parr 18-36

The Hart Parr 18-36 tractor was a two cylinder tractor with a cylinder bore of 6.75 inches and a stroke of 7 inches operating at 800 RPM maximum. The tractor was originally fitted with a transmission offering two speeds ahead and one speed in reverse, a dry clutch, an automotive type coolant radiator which was not pressurized and an air cleaner. The tractor used water as the coolant. Hart Parr built the 18-36 from 1926 to 1930. In 1927 the transmission was redesigned to offer three speeds ahead. 

The tractor was conventional in construction for the time, with a frame built up of structural steel components, riveted together with the engine, transmission and other components of the tractor then bolted to this frame.

The option of hard rubber tires was offered on the 18-36 by Hart Parr as well as dual rear wheels. A further option was a PTO which was driven by off the right hand side of the engine using a clutch band operating on the crankshaft counterbalance which was on the right hand end of the crankshaft. For those farmers wanting to run at night,Hart Parr also offered a lighting option with one forward facing light and one light mounted on a rear fender.

Hart Parr also built versions of the 18-36 for Australia and New Zealand, the Australian and New Zealand Specials. These tractors featured a different air cleaner, a different arrangement of the engine exhaust manifold and lettering on the radiator identifying the tractor as an Australian or New Zealand Special. 

The Museum holds two Hart Parr 18-36 tractors, SN 89632 and SN 90684 in the collection.

Hart Parr 22-40

Hart-Parr 22-40
Hart-Parr 22-40

Hart Parr was a very early American builder of gas tractors with the Hart Parr 30-60 being one of the more successful “Prairie” style tractors. However by 1919 the Prairie style tractors were obsolete being far too big and clumsy for the average farmer of the time.  The need was for smaller, more nimble tractors. Hart Parr’s first attempt to meet the needs of farmers at the time, the “Little Devil”, was a complete failure and the tractors were recalled. However, the right direction was taken in 1918 with the “New Hart Parr” 12-25 model, which formed the basis for all subsequent Hart-Parr tractors. The “New Hart Parr” was a tractor equipped with a two-cylinder, slow speed, water-cooled engine with force feed lubrication and open gears used to drive the rear wheels. The design after testing in Nebraska was re-rated at 15-30. A smaller model, the 10-20, was added to the range in 1921. The 10-20 and 15-30 were soon joined by a 22-40 in 1923. This tractor featured two 10-20 twin-cylinder engines side by side for a combined displacement of 616 cubic inches. The 22-40 was equipped with a Robert Bosch magneto and twin Schebler Model D carburators.  An air cleaner was a $10 option. Apparently an oversized water pump was also an option. The tractor was  nearly 2,000 pounds heavier than the 15-30. The 22-40 was promoted for road building and maintenance jobs as well as for farming. The standard 22-40 came with 13 inch wide cast rear wheels with the option of 18 inch wide cast rear wheels.

Only 496 Hart Parr 22-40s were produced.

The 22-40 was replaced in 1927 with the 28-50 model.

The Museum holds one 22-40 in the collection, SN 70319

Twin City 21-32

Twin City 21-32
Twin City 21-32

The Museum has two Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company Twin City 21-32 tractors in the collection.

Minneapolis Moline Power Implement Company (MM) was formed in 1929 with the consolidation of the Minneapolis Threshing Machine Company, Moline Plow Company, and Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company (MS&MC). The Twin City tractor line made by MS&MC since 1910 continued to be sold by MM through to 1938.

As Twin City tractors had earned a sound reputation and was recognized by farmers,  MM retained the Twin City name and marketed tractors under this name for a period of time. In the early-mid-thirties, MM began to label the tractors as Minneapolis-Moline Twin City.

The Twin City 21-32 design enjoyed a long development period. Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company (MS&MC) began work on the new engine design, the FE, in 1925. Cylinder head design had progressed significantly in the early 1920s and  a two valve per cylinder design was possible that offered better flow than the 4 valve per cylinder design used in the 12-20 and 17-28 at a cheaper cost to manufacture. As well the design was changed to allow cylinders and heads to be cast in two pairs. This was felt to offer ease of repair.

Twin City 21-32

MS&MC installed the FE engine in chassis similar to that used by the 17-28 and called the result the 21-32 tractor. The 21-32 was fitted with a Zenith U-6 carburetor and a dry type Bennett air cleaner. 21-32 was rated at 31 horsepower on the drawbar and 36 horsepower on the belt. 302 21-32s were built between 1916 and 1928.

In 1928, a heavier final drive and transmission was developed that offered three forward speeds. In 1929, Minneapolis-Moline (M-M) replaced the 21-32 with the 21-32 FT which include the new 3 speed transmission. A Stromberg M-3  carburetor, a Donaldson dry type air cleaner and Bosch magneto were fitted to the FE engine.

In the 1930s the 21-32 design was further modified to become the FTA tractor.

Minneapolis Moline Power Implement Company (MM) was formed in 1929 with the consolidation of the Minneapolis Threshing Machine Company, Moline Plow Company, and Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company (MS&MC). The Twin City tractor line made by MS&MC since 1910 continued to be sold by MM through to 1938.

As Twin City tractors had earned a sound reputation and was recognized by farmers,  MM retained the Twin City name and marketed tractors under this name for a period of time. In the early-mid-thirties, MM began to label the tractors as Minneapolis-Moline Twin City.

Allis Chalmers Model E 20-35

Allis-Chalmers-20-35

The Manitoba Agricultural Museum collection contains an Allis Chalmers Model E 20-35 tractor, which was donated to the Museum by Mr. R.W. Gardiner of Clearwater, Manitoba.

Allis-Chalmers-20-35

The Allis Chalmers Company resulted from a 1901 merger of heavy machinery manufacturing companies in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin area. Allis Chalmers (AC) experienced some growth issues which resulted in the company declaring bankruptcy in 1912. The company was reorganized and resumed business. One of the receivers in the bankruptcy was Otto Falk, who become President of the reorganized company. Falk had the idea that AC should enter the farm machinery business. He arranged for AC to obtain the license to build the Motoculture Company’s self-propelled rotary cultivator. However, this Swiss designed cultivator failed to sell to North American farmers. AC then designed a tractor-truck which also failed to sell to farmers. However, AC at the same time designed Model 10-18 tractor which was an example of the three wheeled tractor craze which was sweeping North America at the time. The best example of the three wheeler tractor were the Little Bull and Big Bull tractors. The three-wheeler craze was short lived, and soon fell out of favor with farmers. AC then designed the Model 6-12 tractor which was a motor cultivator type. However, the tractor was not a sales success. To make matters worse, the design so closely copied the Universal tractor, that when Moline purchased Universal, Moline successfully sued AC for copying the design.

At this time, the future of tractor design was being illuminated by the Fordson design. AC designed a response to the Fordson, the AC 15-30. The horsepower rating was too conservative and the tractor was soon re-rated as 18-30 and called the Model E. AC modified the tractor somewhat and the Model E 18-30 when tested at Nebraska, was re-rated again at 20-35. Most of this horsepower increase apparently was due to the engine being configured to burn gasoline. While kerosene-fueled  20-35s were produced, these tractors were exported abroad.

Minneapolis-Moline Twin City FTA

Minneapolis-Moline Twin City FTA
Minneapolis-Moline Twin City FTA
Minneapolis-Moline Twin City FTA Tractor

The Museum has a Minneapolis Moline Twin City FTA tractor in the collection donated by the C. H. Jarvis Family of Dakota, Manitoba.

Minneapolis Moline Power Implement Company (MM) was formed in 1929 with the consolidation of the Minneapolis Threshing Machine Company, Moline Plow Company, and Minneapolis Steel & Machinery Company (MS&MC). The Twin City tractor line made by MS&MC since 1910 continued to be sold by MM through to 1938.

As Twin City tractors had earned a sound reputation and was recognized by farmers,  MM retained the Twin City name and marketed tractors under this name for a period of time. In the early-mid-thirties, MM began to label the tractors as Minneapolis-Moline Twin City.

The FTA was a result of a long development of the Twin City 21-32 design. MS&MC began work on the new engine design, the FE, in 1925. Cylinder head design had progressed significantly in the early 1920s and  a two valve per cylinder design was possible that offered better flow than the 4 valve per cylinder design used in the 12-20 and 17-28 at a cheaper cost to manufacture. As well the design was changed to allow cylinders and heads to be cast in two pairs. This was felt to offer ease of repair.

MS&MC installed the FE engine in chassis similar to that used by the 17-28 and called the result the 21-32 tractor. The 21-32 was fitted with a Zenith U-6 carburetor and a dry type Bennett air cleaner. 21-32 was rated at 31 horsepower on the drawbar and 36 horsepower on the belt. 302 21-32s were built between 1916 and 1928.

In 1928, a heavier final drive and transmission was developed that offered three forward speeds. In 1929, Minneapolis-Moline (M-M) replaced the 21-32 with the 21-32 FT which include the new 3 speed transmission. A Stromberg M-3  carburetor, a Donaldson dry type air cleaner and Bosch magneto were fitted to the FE engine.

In 1935, the engine bore was increased bringing the engine displacement to 403 cubic inches. Compression was increased as well. This redesigned engine was fitted to the FT resulting in the FTA model which was rated at 33 horsepower on the drawbar and 41 horsepower on the belt. Heavy cast rear wheels able to be fitted with rubber tires were also offered. Additional wheel weights could bring the weight of the tractor to nearly 8,000 pounds making the tractor capable of handling heavy tillage tasks.

Minneapolis Moline continued production of the FTA through 1938. Most of these post merger late models have MM-Twin City cast into the top radiator tank. Between the 21-32, FT and FTA, 15,228 units were produced.

Rumely Oil Pull Type R (1926)

Rumely Type R
Rumely Type R

In 1924, Advance – Rumely introduced the “Light Weight” line of Oil Pull tractors which featured a pressed steel frame in place of the heavy channel built up channel iron frame. Rumely completely redesigned the engines, transmissions and drive train used in the Light Weight line as well. The drive gears were completely enclosed and ran in oil, a big advantage over the exposed gears of the Heavy Weights as dust wore exposed gearing badly. The Light Weights were generally more compact tractors than the preceding Heavy Weight designs particularly the Model E and Model F.

The Model R featured a two cylinder engine with 7 13/16 inch bore and 9 ½  in stroke running at 540 rpm. There was force feed lubrication to the engine combined with splash lubrication in the bottom of the crankcase. A Manzel lubricator fed oil to the force feed lubrication system. The engine was equipped with a DU4 Bosch magneto, Donaldson air cleaner and a Seccor-Higgins Carburetor. The transmission offered 3 speeds ahead and one in reverse. Type R was rated at 25-45.

The Museum’s Model R has the serial number 526 making the tractor built in 1926.

The Museum’s Model R is fitted with a disc type flywheel which was introduced on the Light Weights to replace spoked flywheels. The disc type flywheel was disliked as it seemed to magnify engine sounds. As well, it was claimed disc type flywheels could ring like a bell under certain circumstances. Rumely in response to complaints changed back to spoked flywheels on their tractors. Many tractors produced with disc type flywheels had the spoked flywheels installed at a later date.

Wallis 20-30 (1928)

Wallis 20-30
Wallis 20-30

Manufactured by the Massey Harris Company

With the death of J.I. Case in 1891 and the resulting financial troubles, the Case group of companies was split into two entities, the J.I. Case Threshing Machine Company and the J.I. Case Plow Works. Henry Wallis a son-in-law of J.I. Case took over J.I. Case Plow Works in 1892.

Having two companies J.I. Case Threshing Machine Company and J.I. Case Plow Works was a source of confusion which led to legal action between the two companies. J.I. Case Threshing Machine Company was the company which built the Case steam engines and gas tractors.

In 1912 Henry Wallis entered the tractor business and established the Wallis Tractor Company. Right from the start the Wallis Tractor Company built tractors that were well engineered. The 1914 Cub tractor model introduced an important innovation the use of boiler plate formed into a U shape which then formed the engine crankcase and the case for the transmission. A bulkhead divided the crankcase and transmission case. This one piece case provided a stiff foundation for the tractor. Enclosed final drives soon followed. Wallis used roller bearings where possible and was known for the use of high quality materials in construction.

By 1927 Wallis tractors had evolved substantially. The Cub has evolved through the Cub Junior, Model K, Model OK, Certified 15-27 into the 20-30. The 20-30 featured a four cylinder engine with 4.375 inch bore and 5.75  inch stroke, Kingston Model L carburetor, American Bosch ZU4 magneto, Kingston governor, internal engine lubricating oil pump and oil bath air cleaner. The tractor came with a Power take off and a three speed transmission.  In 1928, the J.I. Case Plow Works was purchased by Massey Harris (MH). Wallis was part of this company and MH continued selling Wallis tractors under the Wallis name until 1932. At that time the Model 20-30 was upgraded into the Model 25 which was sold as Massey Harris with the Wallis name disappearing from production.

While Massey Harris (MH) did not produce steam engines, the Massey family had a significant financial interest in the Sawyer Massey Company which did build steamers. However in 1910 there was a disagreement over producing gas tractors which resulted in the Massy family selling their interest in Sawyer Massey. However the Massey family remained interested in gas tractors. The Sawyer Massey experience did point out to the Massey family that engine development was expensive so outside engine suppliers or purchasing a tractor from another manufacturer were options to consider for MH.

In 1917, MH attempted to secure the popular US made Bull tractor, for sale through its dealers. However the deal fell apart. MH then secured the manufacturing rights to the Parrett tractor. The tractor entered production in Toronto in 1918 and stayed in production until late 1922 going through three versions which incorporated various improvements. In 1922, MH realized it could not compete with the Fordson tractor which cost 1/3 the price of the MH Parrett so MH ceased production of the tractor. However MH realized that the lack of tractor line placed MH at a disadvantage compared to companies like IHC. A tractor line was needed and MH then attempted to strike an agreement with the J.I. Case Plow Works to sell this company’s line of Wallis tractors in Canada through MH dealers. In 1928, after complicated negotiations, MH purchased the J.I. Case Plow Works, immediately selling the name to the J.I. Case Threshing Machine Company for ½ the price MH had purchased the entire company for. The purchase of the Plow Works gave MH production plants in the US.MH sold Wallis tractors until 1932 when the tractors were re-badged as Massey Harris.

Wallis Model K

Wallis Model K
Wallis Model K

With the death of J.I. Case in 1891 and the resulting financial troubles, the Case group of companies was split into two entities, the J.I. Case Threshing Machine Company and the J.I. Case Plow Works. Henry Wallis, a son-in-law of J.I. Case, took over J.I. Case Plow Works in 1892.

In 1912 Henry Wallis entered the tractor business and established the Wallis Tractor Company. Right from the start the Wallis Tractor Company built tractors that were well engineered. In 1914 Wallis was building the “Cub”, a technologically advanced machine that was, however, massive in size. The Cub weighed 8,500 pounds with a 52 horsepower engine.

The Cub introduced an important innovation, the use of boiler plate formed into a U shape which formed the engine crankcase and the case for the transmission. A bulkhead divided the crankcase and transmission case. This one piece case provided a stiff foundation for the tractor. Enclosed final drives soon followed. Wallis used roller bearings where possible and was known for the use of high quality materials in construction.

In 1917, Wallis introduced the “Cub Junior” Model J which was much more suitable for the average farmer, weighing only 3,000 pounds and producing 25 horsepower on the belt. The U shaped boiler plate forming the unitized crankcase and transmission case was retained. All gears were enclosed and ran in oil. The Model J featured  a tricycle layout with a single front wheel.

In 1919 the Model J was updated and renamed the Model K with the major difference being a the front end was changed to an axle with two wheels. The tractor did not feature rear fenders, a low price being more important than safety and comfort to most farmers. The basic Wallis design was so good that when Massey Harris (MH) purchased Wallis and the J.I. Case Plow Company in 1928, MH continued the manufacture of Wallis tractors.

While MH was a major Canadian manufacturer of farm machinery, MH never built steam engines and up to the purchase of the J.I. Case Plow Company and Wallis, never had their own design of gas tractor to sell. With the growth of gas tractor sales after 1910, MH realized it needed a fast tractor to sell. In 1917, MH attempted to secure the popular US made Bull tractor, for sale through its dealers. However the deal fell apart. MH then secured the manufacturing rights to the Parrett tractor. The tractor entered production in Toronto in 1918 and stayed in production until late 1922 going through three versions which incorporated various improvements. In 1922, MH realized it could not compete with the Fordson tractor which cost 1/3 the price of the MH Parrett, so MH ceased production of the tractor. However MH realized that a tractor line was still needed and attempted to strike an agreement with the J.I. Case Plow Works to sell this company’s line of Wallis tractors in Canada through MH dealers. In 1928, after complicated negotiations, MH purchased the J.I. Case Plow Works, immediately selling the name to the J.I. Case Threshing Machine Company for ½ the price MH had purchased J.I. Case Plow Company for. The purchase of the Plow Works gave MH production plants in the US. MH sold Wallis tractors until 1932 when the tractors were re-badged as Massey Harris.

IHC Titan Type D 45 (1910s)

IHC Titan 45 Lowe Brothers
IHC Titan 45 Lowe Brothers

The Manitoba Agricultural Museum collection features an IHC Titan Type D 45 that was donated to the Museum by the Lowe Brothers of Foxwarren, Manitoba.

The Type D 45 had its origin in the IHC Reliance Type D of 1910. IHC’s  Milwaukee plant began producing the 20 Horsepower Reliance Type D using IHC “Famous” engine design which was also used in IHC’s Type B 20 horsepower tractor. The Type D 25 horsepower tractor soon followed  and then the Reliance Type D 45 horsepower appeared. The Reliance Type D 45 featured a 2 cylinder engine that was the first engine specifically designed for use in a tractor by IHC. A distinctive rectangular tank type radiator was developed for the Reliance Type D 45. In 1911, the Reliance models were renamed Titan.

The Type D 45 featured a 2 cylinder horizontal engine running at 335 RPM with force feed oiling, make and break ignition, hit and miss governor and a tank type radiator with a pump. The  transmission offered one speed ahead and one speed in reverse. A spur gear drove onto the live  rear axle through a bull gear with a differential in the right rear wheel. The Type D 45 developed 45 horsepower on the belt and 27 horsepower at the drawbar. It was rated as being able to pull a 10 bottom plow.

The Type D 45 was replaced in 1914 by the Titan 30-60.  Between 1911 and 1914, 1319 Type D 45s were built.

The Titan tractors with multiple cylinders, in general, featured engine cylinders that laid side by side where as the Mogul designs featured opposed cylinder engine designs.

A long time resident of the Elton district recounts that the Vance family of the area possessed what he thinks was a Titan 45. However by the time he was old enough to remember this tractor, it was well into the 1930s and the tractor was badly worn. By that time, it was started by the expedient of wrapping a long rope around the belt pulley a number of times and then attaching the free end of the rope to a single tree with a horse harnessed to the single tree. The horse was then started forward at a trot. The engine then began revolving, hopefully firing up. On one occasion, the operator forgot to retard the ignition to start the tractor, the tractor then fired at the top of the piston stroke and ran backwards. The tractor was still powerful enough that it exerted enough pull to snatch the horse backwards, taking the animal off of its feet.  Needless to say this particular horse was never able to be used around the tractor after that experience! Even as part of team on a sheaf wagon at threshing.

Rumely Oil Pull Model K (1921)

Rumely Model K
Rumely Model K

The Manitoba Agricultural Museum’s collection includes a Model K Oil Pull Tractor. The Model K was the smallest of the various models of Heavy Weight Oil Pull Tractors.

7284 Model Ks were built during a production run that occurred between 1918 and 1924.

The model K was powered with a two cylinder engine with a 6 inch bore and 8 inch stroke. As with all Rumley Oil Pulls the engine was cooled with oil circulated by a pump. The radiator was cooled by an exhaust induced draft. The carburetor was  a Seccor-Higgins which automatically metered the amount of water mixed into the kerosene fuel to prevent pre-detonation. A Bosch DU2 magneto was standard on the tractor. The transmission offered two speeds ahead and one speed in reverse. The model K weighed 6.430 pounds. The Model K featured a frame built of heavy channel iron riveted together.

The Model K in the Museum’s collection has a serial number of 17927 making the tractor built in 1921.