Versatile Prototype Bi-Directional Tractor

Versatile - Bi-Directional Prototype

In the mid-1980s, with the sale of Versatile to Ford, the backlot of Versatile was cleaned out. Two prototype tractors were donated to the Manitoba Agricultural Museum at that time, one famous as being a contender for the title of the world’s largest tractor, the four-axle, 500-horsepower Model 1080 tractor, and a tractor that was one of the prototypes for what became Versatile’s Model 150 bi-directional tractor.

Daniel Pakosh, brother to one of the founders of Versatile, came up with a simple idea in the late 1960s. Why not design a loader to fit the rear of a tractor and design the operator’s station so it would swivel to the rear when the operator wanted to use the loader? This idea appeared to offer some advantages, shorter and stronger loader arms, better visibility and better balance on the wheels. With some more thought on the idea, it was realized that the design could also be modified to offer push – pull operation as desired. This arrangement meant a bi-directional tractor could serve as the tractor unit for a self propelled swather.  After the swathing duties were over, the header designed for the bi-directional could be removed and the tractor could then be used to pull a harrow bar, perform loader duties or whatever the farmer needed.

As Versatile in the 1970s offered a wide range of four wheel drive tractors all over 100 horsepower, a tractor under 100 horsepower was thought desirable to fill the product line in. As well it was thought a smaller tractor was more suitable for loader duties, swathing and other duties that a bi-directional tractor was most suited to. Versatile was also a believer in the application of hydrostatic transmissions to farm machinery and it was a natural that a Versatile wanted a hydrostatic transmission in the bi-directional tractor design, particularly for loader operation. As Versatile was a pioneer in articulated, four wheel drive tractors, again it was a natural the design would feature four wheel drive and articulated steering.

Versatile - Bi-Directional Prototype

By 1977, Versatile had finalized a design, the Model 150, and put it into production. The 150 enjoyed good sales success and not only with farmers but with municipalities who appreciated the versatility of a bi-directional combined with Versatile’s rugged, simple design philosophy. However Versatile did not stand on its laurels and improved the concept. The 150 was replaced in 1984 with a new design which offered PTOs, three point linkages and hydraulic outlets on either end, the Model 256.

The Versatile Bi-Directional in the Manitoba Agricultural Museum’s collection appears to be a prototype as it has a number of features that do not appear on the production Model 150. Most noticeably the hydraulic pump is mounted near the articulating hinge and hangs out on the side of the tractor. Obviously in this position the pump would be prone to damage. It may have been there was a previous prototype bi-directional as this particular tractor does not show much evidence of cutting and re-welding of the frame to accommodate design changes. The Model 1080 better known as Big Roy, also a prototype, shows significant cutting and re-welding of the frame to accommodate changes and new components. After the design department was done with the machine rather than being scrapped, the Bi-Directional was used to plow snow at the Versatile plant and for other light duties. When the Versatile Company was sold to Ford, the tractor became surplus and was donated to the Museum.

Massey Harris Model 101 Super Tractor

Massey 101 tractor

The Massey Harris (MH) Model 101 Senior tractor is one of the most recognizable tractors in history with its streamlined hood, bright red paint scheme with yellow wheels, chrome trim and louvered side curtains on the engine bay.  In an era when farm machinery was functional in style to say the least, the Massey 101 was revolutionary.

By 1936 the Wallis tractor designs MH had acquired with the purchase of the J.I. Case Plow Works were dated.  James Duncan, MH’s general manager decided that the worst of the Great Depression was over and now was the time for MH to roll out new tractor designs. Money was still tight but Duncan knew of Chrysler Corporations new industrial flat head six cylinder motor of 201 cubic inches. MH could save money by using this engine rather than designing its own engine. Six cylinder engines at the time were desired by farmers as they were “smooth running”. Chrysler with worldwide operations also offered flathead engine parts and service worldwide. MH then did not have to stock as many parts as it could draw upon Chrysler stocks and technicians. 

As Chrysler used these engines in trucks, the engines came with electric starters. Chrysler apparently believed in big production runs to save money and so would not agree to supply engines other than in the configuration Chrysler had settled on. Whether or not MH wanted electric starters on the engines supplied to MH was immaterial, MH got engines with starters and so the MH 101 was the first tractor with electric start as standard equipment. 

The 101 was introduced to the market in 1938 and offered a four speed transmission, PTO, muffler and instruments as standard equipment. A lighting system was optional.  Twin power was also a standard. The twin power feature resulted in the engine being governed to 1500 RPM when the tractor was being used for drawbar work. When used for belt work the twin power feature could be engaged which allowed for an engine RPM of 1800. This increase in engine RPM delivered more power to the belt. While the twin power feature was engaged the transmission was locked out to prevent damage to the power train from the increased power.  The Chrysler engine when used in MH tractors was governed to a lower RPM than when used in trucks. While limiting RPM reduced horsepower, the lower RPM increased engine life and reduced possibility of engine and drive train damage.

The 101 could be purchased in either row crop or standard configurations. The row crop version also came with adjustable rear wheels, individual rear wheel brakes and a combined PTO and implement lift. MH also offered a single front wheel option for vegetable growers.

In 1939, Chrysler’s 217 cubic inch flat head six was offered as an option in place of the 201 cubic inch engine. 

In 1940 the Twin Power 101 became the Twin Power 101 Super at the same time the 217 cubic inch engine became standard. Super however did not come from the use of the larger engine but as a result of the cylinder walls of the 217 flat head being finished with a finer grit stone resulting in a super finish.  Other than the engine the remainder of the tractor remained the same.  With the 217 Flat head six churning out almost 50 horsepower, the Twin Power 101 Super was one of the largest tractors being built in 1940.

Towards the end of the 101’s production run  the styling altered with the side curtains on the engine bay being changed to a half panel  design which only covered the top half of the engine bay and so exposed the sides of the engine with the exception of the head.  The screened grill lost its chrome trim as well. The air cleaner was moved from behind the grill to behind the engine on the left side. 

The MH 101 also came in a distillate burning version however this variation was badged as a MH 102. As well, the 102 used the same grill and side curtains as a MH 201. So the 102 had a somewhat different appearance than a 101. 

Massey 101 tractor

The MH 201 tractor was built to a larger and different design than the 101. While the hood remained largely the same shape as a 101 hood the grill and side curtains were different shapes. In the case of the grill a cast iron grill was used on the 201 not the stamped steel of the 101. The MH 201 was introduced in 1940 to replace the discontinued MH Model 25. The 201 used a Chrysler 241 cubic inch engine with super finished cylinder walls. Later in 1940 MH began to use the Continental 290 cubic inch engine in the basic  201 design but badged the result as a MH 202. MH also offered a distillate burning version of the 202 which was badged as a 203. The 203 had a somewhat larger Continental engine and a small auxiliary gas tank on which to start the engine before switching to distillate.

To confuse matters more MH began offering the 101 Junior tractor in 1939. The MH 101 Junior was a completely different design from the 101 Senior being a much smaller tractor which featured a 124 cubic inch Continental four cylinder engine when introduced. The 101 Junior was designed to fill the bottom end of the MH tractor line up and compete with the Ford 9N.  In 1940 the 101 Junior changed to a 140 cubic inch Continental engine and then in 1943 changed to a 162 cubic inch Continental  engine.  

One reason that MH switched to Continental engines was that Continental was willing to produce engines in a configuration that the customer wanted. Chrysler would not do this as changing engines on the production line from a standard configuration would slow down production. As well Chrysler probably had it hands full producing engines for military vehicles by 1940. Strange as it seems by today’s standards the Chrysler Flat Head Six design even powered tanks. Five flat head engines were arranged around and geared to a common output shaft to produce an engine called the “Multibank” or “eggbeater” that produced 500 some horsepower.  These engines were installed in some 7500 American Sherman tanks. Most tanks with this engine were shipped to British and Commonwealth countries as lend lease military aid. As wild as this engine looked, apparently it worked well and compared very well to other engines used in Shermans. Chrysler’s flat head six design was nothing but versatile!

Hart Parr 12-24

Hart Parr 12-24
Hart Parr 12-24

Hart Parr was a very early American builder of gas tractors with the Hart Parr 30-60 being one of the more successful “Prairie” style tractors. However by 1919 the Prairie style tractors were obsolete being far too big and clumsy for the average farmer of the time.  The need was for a smaller more nimble tractors. Hart Parr’s first attempt to meet the needs of farmers at the time ,the “Little Devil”, was a complete failure and the tractors were recalled. However, the right direction was taken in 1918 with the “New Hart Parr” 12-25 model, which formed the basis for all subsequent Hart-Parr tractors. The “New Hart Parr” was a tractor equipped with a two-cylinder, slow speed, water-cooled engine with force feed lubrication and open gears used to drive the rear wheels. The design after testing in Nebraska  was re-rated at 15-30. A smaller model, the 10-20, was added to the range in 1921, and this was soon joined by the big 22-40 in 1923, which featured two 20 hp twin-cylinder engines side by side.

Hart Parr 12-24

The 10-20 was produced until 1924 when it was replaced by the 12-24.

The Hart Parr 12-24 tractor was a two cylinder tractor with a cylinder bore of 5.5 inches and a stroke of 6.5 inches running at 850 rpm maximum. The tractor was fitted with a transmission offering two speeds ahead and one speed in reverse, a dry clutch, an automotive type coolant radiator which was not pressurized and an air cleaner. The tractor used water as the coolant. Hart Parr built the 12-24 from 1924 to 1930.

The tractor was conventional in construction for the time, with a frame built up of structural steel components, riveted together with the engine, transmission and other components of the tractor then bolted to this frame.

The Museum holds two 12-24s in the collection, SN 40273 and 42669.

Hart Parr 28-50

Hart Parr 28-50 no canopy
Hart Parr 28-50 no canopy

Hart Parr was a very early American builder of gas tractors with the Hart Parr 30-60 being one of the more successful “Prairie” style tractors. However by 1919 the Prairie style tractors were obsolete being far too big and clumsy for the average farmer of the time.  The need was for smaller, more nimble tractors. Hart Parr’s first attempt to meet the needs of farmers at the time, the “Little Devil”, was a complete failure and the tractors were recalled. However, the right direction was taken in 1918 with the “New Hart Parr” 12-25 model, which formed the basis for all subsequent Hart-Parr tractors. The “New Hart Parr” was a tractor equipped with a two-cylinder, slow speed, water-cooled engine with force feed lubrication and open gears used to drive the rear wheels. The design after testing in Nebraska was re-rated at 15-30. A smaller model, the 10-20, was added to the range in 1921. The 10-20 and 15-30 were soon joined by a 22-40 in 1923. This tractor featured two 10-20 twin-cylinder engines side by side for a combined displacement of 616 cubic inches. 

The 22-40 was replaced in 1927 with the 28-50 model which duplicated the layout but which used 12-24 engines.

The Hart Parr 28-50 tractor was a four cylinder tractor with a cylinder bore of 5.5 inches and a stroke of 6.5 inches running at 850 rpm maximum. The engine appears to have been simply two 12-24 engines twinned. The tractor was fitted with a transmission offering two speeds ahead and one speed in reverse, a dry clutch, an automotive type coolant radiator which was not pressurized and an air cleaner. The tractor used water as the coolant.

Hart-Parr-28-50-Cleaver

The tractor was conventional in construction for the time, with a frame built up of structural steel components, riveted together with the engine, transmission and other components of the tractor then bolted to this frame.

The tractor was designed to operate a 36 inch separator or pull a 5 or 6 bottom plow. The 28-50 was also offered in industrial and road tractor versions. A canopy over the operators station was an option offered by Hart Parr. The 28-50 was also available in an industrial version with solid rubber tires.

Hart Parr built the 28-50 from 1927 to 1930.

The Museum collection holds two 28-50 tractors including one with a canopy SN 71566 donated by Mr. Murray Cleaver of Portage la Prairie, MB. The other 28-50 in the collection is SN 70529.

Hart Parr 16-30

Hart Parr 16-30
Hart Parr 16-30

Hart Parr was a very early American builder of gas tractors with the Hart Parr 30-60 being one of the more successful “Prairie” style tractors. However, by 1919, the Prairie style tractors were obsolete – being far too big and clumsy for the average farmer of the time. The need was for a smaller, more nimble tractor. Hart Parr’s first attempt to meet the needs of farmers at the time, the “Little Devil”, was a complete failure and the tractors were recalled. However, the right direction was taken in 1918 with the “New Hart Parr” 12-25 model, which formed the basis for all subsequent Hart-Parr tractors. The “New Hart Parr” was a tractor equipped with a two-cylinder, slow speed, water-cooled engine with force feed lubrication and open gears used to drive the rear wheels. The design, after testing in Nebraska, was re-rated at 15-30. The 15-30 design was replaced in 1924 by the 16-30 Type E design which was notable for an enclosed final drive gear lubricated with used engine oil. Oil was fed into the engine by the Madison-Kipp Lubricator, but rather than being returned to the force feed lubricator, the oil was piped to the drive gears. The drive gear housing was fitted with overflow pipes, allowing oil to run onto the ground when the final drive housings got too full. The 16-30 was upgraded in 1926 to become the 18-36.

There is a 16-30 at the Museum, SN 25565. This tractor was purchased new by Gustave Hutlet of the Bruxelles area and used on his farm. His son Arthur made one modification to the tractor; he was concerned that a driver could get his foot caught by the right rear drive wheel as the driver was close to this wheel. So he extended the fender on this side of the tractor to keep the driver well away from the rear wheel. Arthur’s son George, can remember last operating the tractor in the 1944 harvest when he was 14 years old; he drove it again – 71 years later – in the 2015 parade at the Threshermen’s Reunion and Stampede. In the 1950s, the tractor was sold to George Down of the Holland area who brought it to the Museum. He later passed it on to Doug Pratt who operates it at Reunion. The Hutlet family still keeps tab on the tractor, and look for it when they are on the Museum grounds.

.

Hart Parr 15-30

Hart Parr 15-30
Hart Parr 15-30

Hart Parr was a very early American builder of gas tractors with the Hart Parr 30-60 being one of the more successful “Prairie” style tractors. However by 1919 the Prairie style tractors were obsolete being far too big and clumsy for the average farmer of the time.  The need was for a smaller more nimble tractors. Hart Parr’s first attempt to meet the needs of farmers at the time, the “Little Devil”, was a complete failure and the tractors were recalled. However, the right direction was taken in 1918 with the “New Hart Parr” 12-25 model, which formed the basis for all subsequent Hart-Parr tractors. The “New Hart Parr” was a tractor equipped with a two-cylinder, slow speed, water-cooled engine with force feed lubrication and open gears used to drive the rear wheels. The design after testing in Nebraska was re-rated at 15-30. The 15-30 design was replaced in 1924 by the 16-30 design which was upgraded in 1926 to become the 18-36. These designs could either burn gasoline or kerosene as fuel.

Hart Parr 15-30s are sometimes referred to as 15-30 Type As, 15-30 Type Bs or 15-30 Type Cs. A number of changes were made over production to the water pump, valve levers and push rods and these changes are differentiated by the model designations.

Hart Parr 18-36

Hart Parr 18-36
Hart Parr 18-36

Hart Parr was a very early American builder of gas tractors with the Hart Parr 30-60 being one of the more successful “Prairie” style tractors. However by 1919 the Prairie style tractors were obsolete being far too big and clumsy for the average farmer of the time.  The need was for a smaller more nimble tractors. Hart Parr’s first attempt to meet the needs of farmers at the time, the “Little Devil”, was a complete failure and the tractors were recalled. However, the right direction was taken in 1918 with the “New Hart Parr” 12-25 model, which formed the basis for all subsequent Hart-Parr tractors. The “New Hart Parr” was a tractor equipped with a two-cylinder, slow speed, water-cooled engine with force feed lubrication and open gears used to drive the rear wheels. The design after testing in Nebraska was re-rated at 15-30. The 15-30 design was replaced in 1924 by the 16-30 design which was upgraded in 1926 to become the 18-36.

Hart Parr 18-36

The Hart Parr 18-36 tractor was a two cylinder tractor with a cylinder bore of 6.75 inches and a stroke of 7 inches operating at 800 RPM maximum. The tractor was originally fitted with a transmission offering two speeds ahead and one speed in reverse, a dry clutch, an automotive type coolant radiator which was not pressurized and an air cleaner. The tractor used water as the coolant. Hart Parr built the 18-36 from 1926 to 1930. In 1927 the transmission was redesigned to offer three speeds ahead. 

The tractor was conventional in construction for the time, with a frame built up of structural steel components, riveted together with the engine, transmission and other components of the tractor then bolted to this frame.

The option of hard rubber tires was offered on the 18-36 by Hart Parr as well as dual rear wheels. A further option was a PTO which was driven by off the right hand side of the engine using a clutch band operating on the crankshaft counterbalance which was on the right hand end of the crankshaft. For those farmers wanting to run at night,Hart Parr also offered a lighting option with one forward facing light and one light mounted on a rear fender.

Hart Parr also built versions of the 18-36 for Australia and New Zealand, the Australian and New Zealand Specials. These tractors featured a different air cleaner, a different arrangement of the engine exhaust manifold and lettering on the radiator identifying the tractor as an Australian or New Zealand Special. 

The Museum holds two Hart Parr 18-36 tractors, SN 89632 and SN 90684 in the collection.

Hart Parr 22-40

Hart-Parr 22-40
Hart-Parr 22-40

Hart Parr was a very early American builder of gas tractors with the Hart Parr 30-60 being one of the more successful “Prairie” style tractors. However by 1919 the Prairie style tractors were obsolete being far too big and clumsy for the average farmer of the time.  The need was for smaller, more nimble tractors. Hart Parr’s first attempt to meet the needs of farmers at the time, the “Little Devil”, was a complete failure and the tractors were recalled. However, the right direction was taken in 1918 with the “New Hart Parr” 12-25 model, which formed the basis for all subsequent Hart-Parr tractors. The “New Hart Parr” was a tractor equipped with a two-cylinder, slow speed, water-cooled engine with force feed lubrication and open gears used to drive the rear wheels. The design after testing in Nebraska was re-rated at 15-30. A smaller model, the 10-20, was added to the range in 1921. The 10-20 and 15-30 were soon joined by a 22-40 in 1923. This tractor featured two 10-20 twin-cylinder engines side by side for a combined displacement of 616 cubic inches. The 22-40 was equipped with a Robert Bosch magneto and twin Schebler Model D carburators.  An air cleaner was a $10 option. Apparently an oversized water pump was also an option. The tractor was  nearly 2,000 pounds heavier than the 15-30. The 22-40 was promoted for road building and maintenance jobs as well as for farming. The standard 22-40 came with 13 inch wide cast rear wheels with the option of 18 inch wide cast rear wheels.

Only 496 Hart Parr 22-40s were produced.

The 22-40 was replaced in 1927 with the 28-50 model.

The Museum holds one 22-40 in the collection, SN 70319

Cockshutt Tiller Combine

Cockshutt tiller combine
Cockshutt tiller combine

Along with moldboard plows, the Cockshutt Plow Company Limited also built disc plows. Disc plows are suitable for the very sticky soils found in many areas. These soils pose problems for moldboard plows. Cockshutt built both horse drawn disc plows and tractor drawn disc plows which ranged in size from one disc to five discs. Along with Cockshutt built plows, Cockshutt also sold the Angell Disc Plow from the Ohio Cultivator Company which came in 6 ft, 8 ft and 10 ft sizes with 20 inch discs. Selling the Angell allowed Cockshutt to offer a more complete line of tillage equipment with a minimum investment. From the Ohio Cultivator Company point of view, an arrangement with Cockshutt increased sales in Canada, an area where the company had no presence, and all at a low cost to Ohio.

cockshutt tiller combine

However, in 1931, Cockshutt took the Angell concept and made a huge leap forward. Cockshutt designed their version of the Angell making a number of improvements along with one important innovation, that of mounting a seed box on the machine. This machine they called a tiller combine.

Cockshutt tiller combine

The Cockshutt Tiller Combine featured disc blades mounted 7 1/2 inches apart. The disc blades were 24 inches in diameter which was a smaller disc than the 30 blades featured on Cockshutt disc plows. All blades were mounted on a single shaft, raised and lowered by a power lift. The shaft was supported on ball bearings, so the entire assembly (shaft and blades) rotated. The depth of penetration of the soil by the blades could be adjusted. When seeding, the seed box dropped the seed down tubes which ran immediately in front of the shaft, and close to the back of each blade. Each blade had its own tube. As the seed was dropped, the blade following behind threw dirt over the seed.

For 1931, the Cockshutt Tiller Combine was a revolutionary concept as the machine was a combined plow, light disc and seeder. Only one field operation was necessary, that of seeding the land in the spring. Fall plowing  was not necessary,  which saved time, money and even more importantly, conserved moisture and reduced soil erosion as the stubble was left on the field to trap snow and slow down the wind at the surface of the soil. When seeding, the combine tiller left a rough surface which aided in reducing wind erosion. The tiller combine did not pulverize the soil, which also aided in reducing soil erosion. Given the drought conditions of the 1930s, the Cockshutt Tiller Combine was the right machine at the right time.

Cockshutt tiller combine

 The Cockshutt Tiller Combine was available in 3.5 ft and 4 ft sizes, suitable for horse traction. The Tiller Combine was also produced in 6 ft, 8 ft and 10 ft sizes suitable for various sizes of tractors.

In 1931, Cockshutt sold 100 units. While this number is small, one must remember the conditions experienced in 1931 of a widespread and serious drought, a collapse in farm prices and a sever economic recession. 100 units in this context was a significant achievement which indicates the concept behind the Tiller Combine was a solid one, that farmers saw value in. Further proof that the concept was a good one was the copying of the Cockshutt Tiller Combine by other farm equipment manufacturers in the years after 1931.

The MAM collection includes  several Cockshutt Tiller Combines including one set up for horse operation with an operator’s seat on the machine. The collection also includes a Cockshutt Tiller Combine painted Canadian Co-operative Implements Limited Orange and sold through CCIL. This machine was built sometime after mid-1945.

Cockshutt wanted to increase sales in 1945, which meant it had to get into the US market. Cockshutt and the US-based National Farm Machinery Co-operative (NFMC) came to an agreement where Cockshutt implements were sold through NFMC outlets across 11 states. Frost and Woods (a subsidiary of Cockshutt) which made haying and harvesting equipment, was also included in this deal. The deal with NFMC allowed Cockshutt into 11 states where Cockshutt had no previous presence, and all at a low cost.

However, to get the deal with NFMC, Cockshutt also had to agree to supply equipment to Canadian Co-operative Implements Limited (CCIL). Cockshutt was not in favor of supplying equipment to CCIL, as CCIL would be in competition for sales of equipment with Cockshutt operations in Western Canada. However, the NFMC was adamant that CCIL was to be included. The deciding factor was that both Co-ops agreed to take a large amount of equipment and would pay for this equipment in advance. As Cockshutt at the time was in the process of developing its own tractor line and expanding its combine line, this money was needed by Cockshutt. And so Cockshutt agreed to supply NFMC and CCIL. Cockshutt painted the equipment supplied to both co-ops in each of the co-op’s color schemes. The orange used by CCIL was different in shade than the orange used by NFMC.

Cockshutt Model 428 Combine

Cockshut model 428

Cockshutt entered combine production in the late 1930s with the introduction of the Number 6 pull type combine.

Cockshut model 428

Well before the Second World War wound down to an end, Cockshutt began planning for the post war period. Cockshutt recognized that the reduced agricultural equipment manufacture resulting from the war along with increased agricultural production would result in the existing stock of farm equipment being worn out by the end of the war. As well farmers would have built up significant bank balances due to decent prices and demand for agricultural products. So there would be good demand after the war for modern farm machinery.

In addition, Cockshutt had modernized their manufacturing plants to manufacture war material for the government. In many cases the government had actively assisted manufacturers, including Cockshutt, to obtain modern manufacturing equipment and develop the needed technical skills to operate this equipment. As well war demands had also resulted in manufacturers being able to increase their engineering staff. Cockshutt as a result had greatly increased capabilities as a company.

One of the first wave of new products for the post war period was the development of a self-propelled combine. The Models SP109 and SP110 were in farmers’ fields in the fall of 1944 and were well received. Cockshutt developed the self-propelled combine line further after the war and introduced further models offering further developments such as hydraulically controlled tables, power steering and variable sheave traction drive.

The MAM collection contains a Cockshutt 428 self-propelled combine. The 428 was in production between 1956 and 1962. The standard 428 come with a 12 foot header however 10 or 15 food headers were offered as options. Other standard equipment included a Chrysler flat head 6 cylinder industrial engine offering 76 horsepower and a Cockshutt Drive-O-Matic traction drive which was a four speed transmission coupled to a variable sheave drive. The variable sheave drive was hydraulically controlled off a foot pedal on the operator’s platform. This combination offered ground speeds varying from 5/8 to 9 MPH. The table was hydraulically raised and lowered.

The cylinder had 8 rasp bars and was 311/4 inches long and 21 7/8 inches in diameter. The speed of the cylinder could be varied from 727 rpm to 1178 rpm. The separation area was 32 inches wide and 117 inches long.

Accessories included a retractable finger auger on the table, lights, a pickup reel with 4 or 6 inch tooth spacing, ScourKleen auxiliary recleaner, slow speed cylinder sprockets, straw spreader and hour meter.

The Cockshutt Model 427 was essentially the same machine only a smaller engine was used which offered only 72 horsepower.